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About The Crappie

Two species of crappie, the black crappie (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) and white crappie (Pomoxis annularis), are found in turbid waters throughout United States, chiefly in the southern areas. Similar in appearance, the black crappie is more oval in shape and has a darker, almost olive, coloration, unlike the white crappie. Mostly silver to drab olive in color, they have the same oval shape as a sunfish with a lower jaw that protrudes past the upper jaw. Dark spots or bands are evident on its scaley sides, and its dorsal and anal fins are spiney and fan-shaped. The tail, much like the fins, is lightly spotted. Crappie prefer deeper, discolored water and hold near drop-offs, sunken logs or brush. They feed on insects, worms, larvae, and minnows. Favorite among anglers for sheer numbers and eagerness to take artificial offerings, the crappie makes for excellent table fair.

White Crappies became, by far, the predominant fish caught through the ice. The lake has developed a reputation as a good Walleye lake but the Crappie was the master in the winter. It's a mystery as to how the crappie were introduced to the lake. Local "ol' timers" and the Department of Environmental Conservation have their theories but the truth will never be known. 

The White Crappie is strongly dominant in the Whitney Point Lake. Very few Black Crappie are taken in this body of water. In the Whitney Point Lake, there is a minimum size limit and a creel limit in place.

Recent NYS DEC documentation of interest: 
regarding Crappies and Whitney Point Lake:
         Complements of Dave Lemon 

Website Link providing synopsis of the reservoir's fishery:   http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/38465.html
            This is strongly recommended reading
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